langstroth-beehive

Using a Beehive Inspection Checklist
July 27, 2020 · · Health & Pests

The only way to know exactly what is going on in a beehive is to actually take a peek inside. This can be intimidating, especially to a new beekeeper, but it doesn’t have to be.

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A Slatted Rack and Robbing Screen Can Improve Your Hive Entrance
July 19, 2020 · · Hives & Equipment

One of the best things about a Langstroth beehive is its adaptability. By using optional pieces of beehive equipment like a slatted rack and robbing screen, you can adapt your beehive to suit local conditions.

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How to Customize Your Hive With a Screened Inner Cover and Imirie Shim
May 31, 2020 · · Hives & Equipment

Add to Favorites Just as you can alter the entrance to your Langstroth beehive, you can also alter the top. Two pieces of optional equipment to consider are a screened …

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Emergency, Swarm, and Supercedure Cells, Oh My!

I remember seeing the queen in our first ever hive and thinking to myself, “I’ll never find supercedure cells since I’m going to do all I can to keep her alive forever.” Of course, that’s not the reality of beekeeping.

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Top Bar Beehives vs Langstroth Beehives
April 2, 2020 · · Hives & Equipment

Not long after our teenage son started raising honey bees, a family friend built him a top bar beehive with an observation window using beehive plans from a homesteading book. It was such an amazing gift.

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Common Langstroth Hive Setup

A Langstroth hive is the most common beehive in developed countries. Lorenzo Lorraine Langstroth (the creator) observed that if 1 cm space was left between the cover of a hive and the top bars, that the bees would not fill it with burr comb or propolis—it was deemed walking around space.

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5 Tips for Starting Beekeeping

Will you utilize the most commonly used hive style, the Langstroth beehive or do you fancy yourself a top bar or Warre beekeeper? For protective equipment, you could use a veil, a jacket with vail, or a full body bee suit – which works for you? Location of your hive can impact your bees based on sun exposure (summer v. winter), wind exposure, accessibility, proximity to neighbors, and so on.

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Supering up for a Honey of a Summer

In the beginning beekeeping classes, I encourage new beekeepers to go into their hives at least every seven to 10 days to see how things are going. While a healthy colony of bees in a healthy environment will follow a generally predictable course, growing in population as spring advances, swarming, building again, then capitalizing on the summer honey flows, there are a lot of variations on this theme and a lot can go awry in a relatively short time. Problems tend to propagate themselves if not dealt with early, a small problem uncorrected becomes a bigger problem, then an even bigger problem, then a disaster. The beekeeper’s role is to keep things on course.

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Flow Hive Review: Honey on Tap

Add to Favorites I never thought that I would be keeping bees. In fact, my healthy fear of them as a child had me spending warm summer days indoors and …

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How to Start Beekeeping in Your Backyard
February 1, 2019 · · Beekeeping 101

Add to Favorites This year we started raising honey bees. I wanted to do this for the last couple of years but for one reason or another, it didn’t work …

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