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How Do I Know if My Bees Are Too Hot?
May 19, 2019 · · Health & Pests

Add to Favorites One of my favorite places to be on our property is in the bee yard. I will occasionally sneak in there with camera in hand and just …

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Why We Need to Protect Native Pollinator Habitat

Add to Favorites Doug Ottinger – Regardless of whether we live a rural lifestyle, an urban one, or something in between, our existence, and continuance of the world as we …

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Let’s Talk About Losing Bees

Like many beekeepers, we lost bees this winter. New packages failed to build up in a normal way last summer and were unusually slow to build comb and put away stores into fall. In September, aggressive yellow jacket predation weakened them further leaving them unable to carry themselves through the cold.

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What To Know As Spring Unfolds Into Summer

If April is the beekeeping equivalent of planting time, then May is when our efforts start to germinate.

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Propolis: Bee Glue that Heals

Honeybee propolis is a brown or reddish resinous substance made by bees to protect the hive against animal and bacterial invaders. The word “propolis” is a compound of the Greek words “pro” and “polis” and translates to, “Before the city.” Bees use propolis as a building material to fill gaps and crevices, varnish combs and shape entrances, sometimes creating fantastic gobs that supposedly aid ventilation in the hive.

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From Point A To Point Bee

When I sell bees to a new beekeeper, the question of moving bees often comes up. I get questions like, “Why do you move them after dark?” or “Can I move them again once they are set?” or “Why do they have to be moved at least two miles away?” These and other questions about the subject are not easily understood and can be very confusing to beginners. Yet, the more we learn about bees the easier they are to understand.

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Bee Patient: How Angry Honey Bees Taught Me to Take a Deep Breath
February 5, 2019 · · Beekeeping 101

Add to Favorites By Phillip Meeks, Virginia – Let me say this up front: I’m not naturally a patient person. I tend to wring my hands and pace the floor if it looks …

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Supering up for a Honey of a Summer

In the beginning beekeeping classes, I encourage new beekeepers to go into their hives at least every seven to 10 days to see how things are going. While a healthy colony of bees in a healthy environment will follow a generally predictable course, growing in population as spring advances, swarming, building again, then capitalizing on the summer honey flows, there are a lot of variations on this theme and a lot can go awry in a relatively short time. Problems tend to propagate themselves if not dealt with early, a small problem uncorrected becomes a bigger problem, then an even bigger problem, then a disaster. The beekeeper’s role is to keep things on course.

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What is Honey Bee Dysentery?
February 1, 2019 · · Health & Pests

Beekeeping is rife with confusing terminology that can baffle even experienced beekeepers. Honey bee dysentery is a perfect example.

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Beekeeping with the Warre Hive: The Original Homestead Beehive

Add to Favorites By Ernie Schmidt, Washington – Beekeeping with the Warre hive, for me, is the easiest way to care for bees. The Warre beehive was developed specifically to be …

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