eggs

Emergency, Swarm, and Supercedure Cells, Oh My!

I remember seeing the queen in our first ever hive and thinking to myself, “I’ll never find supercedure cells since I’m going to do all I can to keep her alive forever.” Of course, that’s not the reality of beekeeping.

Read More
What Happens When the Queen Bee Dies?

Raising honeybees is a challenge. One day your hive looks good and a few days later you wonder if it’s going to live.

Read More
The Ins and Outs of Buying Bees
February 9, 2020 · · Beekeeping 101

Every spring potential beekeepers begin to get excited about starting to keep bees. They read beekeeping books and articles, and talk to experienced beekeepers about everything from setting up their apiary to buying bees.

Read More
Propolis Benefits Inside and Outside the Hive
January 2, 2020 · · Honey & Beeswax

When people think about products that bees produce they often think of honey and beeswax, but bees also make other products such as royal jelly and propolis. Benefits of each of these products can be seen inside the beehive and outside the hive.

Read More
Which Bees Make Honey?
December 28, 2019 · · Beekeeping 101

While not all bees make honey, there are many species that do—perhaps hundreds.

Read More
What You Can Learn from the Beehive Entrance
October 6, 2019 · · Hives & Equipment

Add to Favorites One of the most anticipated jobs for the beekeeper is doing a hive inspection. This is when you get to look into the hive and be assured …

Read More
How to Talk to Vegans About Honey & Bees

I have yet to meet a beekeeper—commercial or hobbyist—who doesn’t adore his or her bees. There is a beauty and a romance to beekeeping that begins with the sun, and, if you are lucky, ends in a bonanza of the best tasting honey you have ever known.

Read More
How Do I Know if My Bees Are Too Hot?
May 19, 2019 · · Health & Pests

Add to Favorites One of my favorite places to be on our property is in the bee yard. I will occasionally sneak in there with camera in hand and just …

Read More
What To Know As Spring Unfolds Into Summer

If April is the beekeeping equivalent of planting time, then May is when our efforts start to germinate.

Read More
Supering up for a Honey of a Summer

In the beginning beekeeping classes, I encourage new beekeepers to go into their hives at least every seven to 10 days to see how things are going. While a healthy colony of bees in a healthy environment will follow a generally predictable course, growing in population as spring advances, swarming, building again, then capitalizing on the summer honey flows, there are a lot of variations on this theme and a lot can go awry in a relatively short time. Problems tend to propagate themselves if not dealt with early, a small problem uncorrected becomes a bigger problem, then an even bigger problem, then a disaster. The beekeeper’s role is to keep things on course.

Read More